Landscapes Art to go Follow-up Project

This activity is a follow-up activity to our Art to Go presentations, therefore we have only included core standard for the 4th grade.

Introduction:

With your landscape creation, students should remember that they are not a camera recording of whatever might be in front of a lens.  Students may use their imagination to create a land that isnít like anything they have ever seen before.

Tell your students that in a landscape, they get to create the sky, the wind, the warmth of the sun, or the slow meandering of a stream. They can create the trees that will bend in the wind, or stand up tall into the sky. They can invent flowers of all different colors and shapes. They will create the clouds drifting across the sky creating wonderful shapes and forms.  They will decide what their plants and trees will look like. Will they look real or will they be a tree or flower that no one has ever seen before? A species that doesnít exist that can be named after its creator! 

Perspective:

Foreground, middle ground, background

Even though your landscape is whatever you can dream up, there are a few rules to follow. Nearer things in your foreground will appear bigger and lower in your piece.  The farther away, or background, the higher your object is on your paper and the smaller it will be. To demonstrate, have two students as examples.  Stand one in front and the other way behind. Guide your students through a series of questions on how each student looks compared to the other based on the distance of each from your students.

 

Collage Landscape project #1 by Crayola.com:

*With this lesson you can incorporate Science core standards as well as the Visual Arts. Instructions to do this follows the art lesson plan by Crayola.

Description: Create a unique display of the Earthís landforms. Showcase learning with textured materials such as sandpaper, aluminum foil, and corrugated paper.

Learning goals:    Find out about the many different types of the Earthís landforms such as deserts, mountains, oceans, plateaus, coastlines, and marshlands. What characteristics make each of them unique?

Preparation: Assemble materials (scraps of aluminum foil, corrugated paper or cardboard, sandpaper, colored construction paper, poster board, markers, crayons, colored pencils, glue, cotton balls, scissors) 

 

Lesson:

1.       For the background, overlap big pieces of poster board. Hold the seams together with Crayolaģ School Glue. Air-dry the background.

 

2.       Use your imagination and Crayola Erasable Colored Pencils to sketch various areas of landforms on the background.

 

3.       Choose materials that best portray the textures of each area. For instance, sandpaper is great for deserts or plateaus. Aluminum foil makes shiny water. Consider corrugated paper, cotton balls, and other items, too.

 

4.       With Crayola Gel Markers, color in areas such as sky, evergreens, and coastline.

 

5.       Using Crayola Scissors, cut out pieces of textured materials such as sandpaper, aluminum foil, or corrugated paper. Glue them in place on the landscape.

 

6.       Gel Markers write on many surfaces. Color aluminum foil blue to represent water. Try these markers on sandpaper and other surfaces for a unique look.

 

7.       Draw objects such as animals, grasses, wildlife, rocks, cacti, and mountain ranges with colored pencils on construction paper. Color them, cut them out, and glue on the bulletin board landscape.

 

8.       Write labels for the landforms. Cut them out and glue in place. Invite your friends and families to see your magnificent display of what you learned about the Earth!


 

 

Core Standards for 4th grade Visual arts covered in Art to Go presentation and this activity:

1.      Standard 1, Objective 2, a. Provide proper ventilation when working with are materials that give off fumes.

2.      Standard 1, Objective 2. B. Dispose and/or recycle are material waste in a safe and appropriate manner.

3.      Standard 1, Objective 2, c. Clean and store art material wastes in a safe and appropriate manner

4.      Standard 1, Objective 2 d. Clean and put back to order art making areas after projects.

5.       Standard 2, Objective 1, a. Recognize how height placement creates depth in the artwork

6.      Standard 2, Objective 1, c. Recognize space divisions to create more interesting composition

7.      Standard 2, Objective 1, d. Identify depth, shadow, color, and mood.

8.      Standard 2, Objective 2, a. Draw the base of a distant object higher up on the drawing page than the base of objects that are meant to be in the foreground.

9.      Standard 2 Objective 2,e . Identify repetitive elements that create movement

10.  Standard 3,  Objective 2, d. Classify media and genre

11.  Standard 3 Objective 2, b. Interpret how the artist represented moods, feeling and ideas

12.  Standard 3, Objective 1, a Explore sources of inspiration

13.  Standard 3 Objective 2, e Identify themes in works of art

14.  Examine the overall value key of significant works of art and relate the key of each work to a mood

15.  Standard 3, Objective 2,  e Identify themes in works of art

 

To incorporate 4th grade Science core standards:

This project will take one week to complete.  Use the Craylola lesson plan above.

Day 1. Break the students into 3 groups. Assign wetlands, forest or desert to each group.  Each group will complete the above project for their assigned environment. The Students landscape project should have the characteristics of the assigned environment.  The first thing the students should do is identify the region of Utah where the assigned environment exists. Have the students discuss the landscape and then select the materials they would like to use for their project. They can now begin the background for their assigned climate.  Soil layers must be represented on the piece.

Day 2. Have your students find the annual rainfall amounts, temperatures and then add in clouds and weather to the piece.

Day 3. Add all plant life (Point out that plant life is there to minimize erosion and feed animal life)  

Day 4.  Add the Animal life and insects

Day 5. A presentation is made to the rest of the class. In their presentation have them address rainfall amounts, temperatures, cloud types most likely in their climate and explain each item on their project.  

After all presentations are made, lead a discussion on the differences of each climate using the studentís artwork as your visual aid!

This project fulfills the above visual art 4th grade core standards and the following science 4th grade core standards:

1.       Standard 2, objective 1, a. Identify basic cloud types (i.e. Cumulus, Cirrus, Stratus clouds) 

2.       Standard 3, Objective 1 d.. Classify common rocks found in Utah as sedimentary (i.e., sandstone, conglomerate, shale), igneous (i.e., basalt, granite, obsidian, pumice) and metamorphic (i.e., marble, gneiss, schist). Discuss rock Classifications with your student and decide which kinds they would like to include in their land forms Landscape.

3.       Standard 3, Objective 3: a. Diagram or model: a soil profile showing topsoil, subsoil, and bedrock, and how the layers differ in composition.

4.       Standard 3, Objective 3, b. Relate the components of soils to the growth of plants in soil (e.g. Mineral nutrients, water

5.       Standard 3, Objective 3, c. Explain how plants may help control the erosion of soil.

6.       Standard 5, Objective 1, a. Compare the physical characteristics of Utahís Wetlands, forests and deserts

7.       Standard 5 , Objective 1, b. Describe Utahís Wetlands, forests and deserts.

8.       Standard 5, Objective 1, c. Locate examples of areas that have characteristics of wetlands, forests and deserts.   

9.       Standard 5, Objective 1, d. Based upon information gathered, classify areas of Utah that are generally identified as wetlands, forests or deserts.

10.   Standard 5, Objective 1, e. Create models of wetlands, forests and deserts.

11.    Standard 5, Objective 2, a. Identify common plants and animals that inhabit Utahís forests, wetlands and deserts

12.   Standard 5, Objective 2, b. Cite examples of physicals features that allow particular plants and animals to live in specific environments.                                         

 

 

Follow up lesson #2:  Perspective

 

Description: This is a quick and easy project. Students will paint a monochromatic Landscape.

Learning goals: To create depth by using color and placement

Materials: Blue and red paint, paper, pencil

 

Basic Concepts: Colors lighten with distance,

                             The further away an object is, the smaller it is, if itís closer, itís bigger.

 

 

Lesson:  Draw outlines of hills with a pencil. Start with the hills closest to you. These hills will be lower on the page and will go from one edge of the paper to the other.

*Mix a very light shade of blue paint with a touch of red. Fill in the Sky. Add a little more blue. Fill in the hills that are furthest away. Add more blue and a bit of red and fill in the next range of mountains. Continue adding more paint to darken the color until all the hills are filled in.

Have the students look at their piece and notice where their eye naturally goes. With the repetition of the lines for the mountain Ranges, ask them if their eye just continues to jump and move from line to line. Point out that the repetitive nature of the lines creates movement within this simple piece.

*Start with just a little paint, I started with too much and had to keep adding more to get the paint darker. I ended up with too much paint!

 

 

Lesson from The Usborne Complete Book of Art Ideas

 

Core Standards for 4th grade Visual arts covered in Art to Go presentation and activity:

Standard 1, Objective 2, a. Provide proper ventilation when working with are materials that give off fumes.

1.      Standard 1, Objective 2. B. Dispose and/or recycle are material waste in a safe and appropriate manner.

2.      Standard 1, Objective 2, c. Clean and store art material wastes in a safe and appropriate manner

3.      Standard 1, Objective 2 d. Clean and put back to order art making areas after projects.

4.       Standard 2, Objective 1, a. Recognize how height placement creates depth in the artwork

5.      Standard 2, Objective 1, c. Recognize space divisions to create more interesting composition

6.      Standard 2, Objective 1, d. Identify depth, shadow, color, and mood.

7.      Standard 2, Objective 2, a. Draw the base of a distant object higher up on the drawing page than the base of objects that are meant to be in the foreground.

8.      Standard 2 Objective 2, e. Identify repetitive elements that create movement

9.      Standard 3,  Objective 2, d. Classify media and genre

10.  Standard 3 Objective 2, b. Interpret how the artist represented moods, feeling and ideas

11.  Standard 3, Objective 1, a Explore sources of inspiration

12.  Standard 3 Objective 2, e Identify themes in works of art

13.  Examine the overall value key of significant works of art and relate the key of each work to a mood

14.  Standard 3, Objective 2,  e. Identify themes in works of art

15.   Standard 4, Objective 2, e. Repeat elements to create movement in artwork.